NMTAFE (Balga) – Recommencement of Automotive & Marine Trimming

Training of Automotive Trimming Apprentices has recommenced at Balga Campus under the \”Local training for Local Needs\” initiative developed by the State Government.

Apprentice training ceased a few years ago and the few employers who took on apprentices in Automotive Trimming had to send apprentices to TAFENSW for training.

The team at Balga has been busy developing resources for delivery as well as attending to Teaching Qualifications over the past 12 months and they are pleased to add that the numbers of registered apprentices has started to flow back into the courses at Balga.

Late last year the Automotive and Marine Trimming started with 5 apprentices who were joined by a further 7 apprentices this year with a total of 12 apprentices enrolled state wide.

The facility at Balga Campus houses not only the Automotive and Marine Trimming (inc Aviation Upholstery), but also Furniture Upholstery and Manufactured Textiles. A one stop shop for the associated Craft Trades for WA.

Employer and Apprentice feedback has been very positive and the training facility is well established again with specialist tools and equipment. We still have a way to go I am happy with the quality of all the resources and facility and we have not dropped the ball at any time while striving to be on top of the game in Quality Training that meets Industries needs at this early stage.

For further information, please contact Gary McCormick | Part Time Lecturer Automotive & Marine Trimming Technology North Metropolitan TAFE | L Block Balga Campus, Gate 1 Loxwood Road, Balga 6010 M 0438 821 346

WA Training Awards 2019

The WA Training Awards recognise and reward outstanding achievements of apprentices, trainees and vocational students, and the contribution to training made by trainers, training organisations and employers.

Through celebrating these successes, the Awards continue to put our State’s top achievers in the spotlight.

There are 13 categories in the WA Training Awards; eight individual categories and four organisation categories.

Applications for the WA Training Awards 2019 close on Friday 3 May at 5.00pm.
 

Individual categories:

  • WA Apprentice of the Year
  • WA School-based Apprentice of the Year
  • WA Trainee of the Year
  • WA Vocational Student of the Year
  • WA Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Student of the Year
  • WA Cultural Diversity Training Award
  • WA International Student of the Year
  • WA Trainer of the Year

Organisation categories:

  • WA Large Employer of the Year
  • WA Medium Employer of the Year
  • WA Industry Collaboration Award
  • WA Small Training Provider of the Year
  • WA Large Training Provider of the Year

Winners in individual categories receive $3,000 to further their training or kick start their careers. Organisation winners are recognised  as industry leaders and provided with marketing materials to promote their achievement.  

Winners will be announced at a Presentation Dinner on Friday 13 September 2019.

For further information, please click the following link: https://www.dtwd.wa.gov.au/watrainingawards/about-the-awards#about-the-awards

State Training Plan 2017-2020

The State Training Board prepares a State Training Plan each year, which contributes to the policy and purchasing direction for the State’s training system for the short to medium term. The Plan is developed each year within the context of current State and national vocational education and training policies, commitments and agreements.

The new State Training Plan 2017–2020 identifies and recommends key areas of focus such as:

  • enhancing industry engagement;
  • supporting and promoting innovation and technology within the education and training sector;
  • priority for the employment of apprentices and trainees on major WA projects;
  • creating skills development opportunities for young people;
  • skilling our social assistance and allied health workforce; and
  • supporting older workers.

A range of inputs are used to inform the Plan, including:

  • analysis of economic, labour market and demographic data;
  • industry consultation and advice,
  • regional advice; and
  • other relevant research and reports.

View the State Training Plan 2017–2020 on the State Training Board website at stb.wa.gov.au/stp2017

New Apprenticeship and Traineeship Policy Release

Following extensive consultation with stakeholders, the Department of Training and Workforce Development (DTWD) has updated its “Apprenticeship and Traineeship Policy  (A&T Policy). The revised policy came into effect on 29 November 2018, and is now available on the DTWD website.

View the new Apprenticeship and Traineeship Policy

The new A&T Policy has been simplified to make it more user-friendly for apprentices, trainees, employers, RTOs, AASNs, GTOs, students, parents and schools. The key changes are as follows:

  • All related policy documents are now incorporated. This includes the School-based Apprenticeship Policy; Travel and Accommodation Allowance (TAA) Policy; Trade Skills Recognition Policy; and the Trade Certificate Policy.
  • The policy includes web links for easy access to program information and fact sheets and forms for employers, apprentices, RTOs and other providers operating in the apprenticeship system.
  • The strengthening of eligibility criteria for Western Australian trade certificates, including those issued under the Trade Skills Recognition (TSR) process, to ensure the integrity of the application and assessment processes.  The new eligibility criteria will come into effect on 1 January 2019.
  • Individuals who are qualified tradespeople in an Australian State or Territory other than Western Australia are now able to apply for a WA Trade Certificate, if they meet the requirements.
  • The policy reflects recent changes to regulations, which clarify requirements around training plans, including school-based apprentices and trainees.

Several fact sheets on the Apprenticeship Office website have been updated to align with the new policy and the following new fact sheets have been developed.

Title Location
Applying for a WA trade certificate by interstate tradespeople Other publications
Applying for a WA trade certificate via trade skills recognition (effective from 1 January 2019) Information for RTOs, and also in Other publications
Eligibility for a WA trade certificate Other publications
Training contract and exemption notices for children of compulsory school age Training contract forms and fact sheets

The following policy documents relate to the DTWD role as Western Australia’s State Training Authority, with responsibility for administering the State’s VET system. This involves managing the investment of public resources to provide a quality training system.

·        Apprenticeship and Traineeship Policy

·        Complaints Management Policy

·        Government Building Training Policy

·        Language Services Policy and Guidelines

·        School-based Apprenticeship and Traineeship Policy

·        Sponsorship Policy

·        TAFE Admissions Policy

·        TAFE Duty of Care for Minors Policy

·        Trade Certificate Policy

·        Trade Skills Recognition Policy

·        Travel and Accommodation Allowance Policy

·        VET Fees and Charges Policy

·        VET Delivered to Secondary Students: Funding Policy

These policy documents can be accessed via the following link:  https://www.dtwd.wa.gov.au/about-us#legislative-framework-policies-and-guidelines

Please contact Anna Wildy, Manager Policy Planning and Research, Department of Training and Workforce Development on (08) 6551 5529 or email anna.wildy@dtwd.wa.gov.au, if you have any queries in regards to the new apprenticeship and traineeship policy and any of the associated policy documents.

 

HVIA Releases Safer Trucks & Trailers Action Plan

In the November edition of Australasian Transport News (ATN), HVIA Chief Executive Todd Hacking has challenged Government to incentivise the uptake of safety technologies.

“Road safety is everyone’s responsibility:  the people who design, build and maintain roads; the people who use the road network, such as drivers, cyclists, pedestrians and motorcyclists; the people who import or manufacture vehicles; the people who police road user behaviour and of course those responsible for implementing policy, laws and regulations pertaining to road use and road safety.

“As an association that advocates for the businesses that design, import, manufacture and distribute heavy vehicles and supply components for trucks and trailers, HVIA is at the forefront of showcasing innovation, technology and the latest safety features.

“Our members are constantly innovating and developing ways to make their vehicles safer.  Sometimes this is mandated through the Australian Design Rules (ADRs) but often this is voluntary and is part of being a good corporate citizen.

“The fact is that heavy vehicles rolling off the assembly line in 2018 are the safest yet, and as the industry continues to innovate and invest in design and technology, the safety features will continue to advance in future years.

“This advancement in safety is also true for passenger vehicles. In spite of these safer vehicles operating on better performing roads and at safer speeds, Australia is not seeing the requisite downward trend on the road toll.

“The tragic reality is that last year 1,227 people died on Australian roads.  Sadly, this also includes 185 people from accidents involving a heavy vehicle.  These deaths are largely preventable.

“As such, HVIA has asked itself: what more can be done to reduce road fatalities?  I’m proud that our members have come up with a series of priority actions which we have now released as part of a new campaign – Safer Trucks & Trailers: Incentivising the Uptake of Safety Technologies.

“This action plan argues that the highest priority is a deliberate strategy of targeting older vehicles in the fleet, reducing the age of the fleet by doing so, or incentivising the retrofit of available safety technologies to improve heavy vehicle safety.”

Mr Hacking says the document is intended to start a constructive, mature discussion on advancing road safety.

“This is a logical first step to target the vehicles most in need, and does so in a way that does not punish heavy vehicle operators, but rather incentivises the uptake of available safety technologies.”

 

 

The Minimum Employment Age For Most Jobs In WA Is 15 Years Old

 

The Children and Community Services Act 2004 regulates where, when, and at what age children can be employed in Western Australia and these laws apply to all employers throughout the State.

In most industries, children under 15 cannot be employed unless they are working in a family business run by a relative such as a parent, aunt, uncle or grandparent; performing professionally as an actor, musician, entertainer or in an advertisement; or working for charities and other not-for-profit organisations.  Jobs in which children under 15 cannot be employed include working on a farm or at horse riding schools and stables, working in construction or on any building or home or garden maintenance work, and working in a factory or warehouse.

The Children and Community Services Act specifies that children aged 10, 11 or 12 are allowed to deliver newspapers or advertising material, but they cannot work during school hours and cannot start work before 6am or finish later than 7pm.  Workers of this age must be accompanied at all times by a parent, or another adult who has written permission from their parents.

A child must be at least 13 years old to be employed in a shop, fast food outlet, café or restaurant.  Employers are also required to get written permission from a child’s parent and the child is not allowed to work before 6am and after 10pm or during school hours.

Breaches of the Children and Community Services Act attract penalties of up to $120,000 if the employer is a body corporate.  In 2015 a supermarket business in regional Western Australia was fined $2,250 in the Industrial Magistrate’s Court for illegally employing an 11-year-old girl.  The charge related to the employment of the child as a shop assistant for five shifts of work that were performed on weekend days.

Employers who are considering employing children are encouraged to check the legal requirements by contacting Wageline on 1300 655 266 or visit www.dmirs.wa.gov.au/wageline 

Certificate III in Appliance Servicing (UEE 32111) Apprenticeship in Western Australia

The UEEA Training Council, Appliance Servicing Industry and Energy Skills Solutions are happy to announce the commencement of the UEE 32111 Certificate III in Appliance Servicing apprenticeship in Western Australia.

The Certificate III in Appliance Servicing was established as a Class A qualification in 2010, however delivery is unavailable in Western Australia and apprentices are required to attend training in Queensland or New South Wales. This training is inflexible, cumbersome, time consuming and cost prohibitive.

Manufacturers were using small teams of their own technicians and in some cases contracting out warranty work to the appliance service specialists. Not having the apprenticeship delivered in WA, has led to the appliance service industry having serious skill deficiencies, which in turn has had an adverse effect on product reputation.

Enormous efforts by all stake holders has gone into getting the training to this level, including the Department of Training and Workforce Development who have approved the funding for this apprenticeship.

Energy Skills Solutions will commence training for their first group of apprentices on Monday 2nd October 2017. Recognised Prior Learning (RPL) will also be available for existing employees.

For further information on the Certificate III in Appliance Servicing apprenticeship, please contact: Jonathan Andrews, Director, Energy Skills Solutions, PO Box 2857, MALAGA 6944.                    T: (08) 9209 3833,  M: 0421 717 287, E:  jonathan@energyskillssolutions.com.au